Google: 'Our Public Domain Name System (DNS) service intercepted by ISP's in Turkey'

Google is claiming that ISPs in Turkey are intercepting their DNS service.

The implication, unstated in Google’s announcement, is that this is being done in order to block services such as YouTube and Twitter which are banned by the government.

The company cites “credible reports” and their own research.

The Turkish government has been on a campaign against Twitter and YouTube lately over their use by critics of the government. On Saturday the government condemned YouTube for a recording posted on it of a government official discussing possible military action in Syria.

Turkish authorities ordered YouTube shut down, just as they had ordered Twitter shut some time ago. The order given to ISPs to remove access to the services in their DNS, but many have been getting around the problem by setting their DNS to Google’s free public DNS service (primary: 8.8.8.8, secondary 8.8.4.4).

Google is claiming that Turkish ISPs, apparently under order of the government, are intercepting access of Google’s servers and redirecting them to their own DNS, thus re-enabling the ban.

‘Apparently in order to enforce a government ban on certain services, Turkish ISPs are intercepting access of Google’s public DNS service’, commented ZDNet blog.

Google on Saturday warned that its Public Domain Name System (DNS) service has been intercepted by the majority of Internet Service Providers (ISPs) in Turkey.

Google’s Public DNS resolution service lets people use the search giant’s DNS servers as an alternative to their DNS provider, often an ISP. The service offers both performance and security benefits over many ISP DNS services.

According to Google’s Steven Carstensen, Turkish ISPs have set up servers that are essentially masquerading as Google’s DNS service.

“We have received several credible reports and confirmed with our own research that Google’s Domain Name System (DNS) service has been intercepted by most Turkish ISPs (Internet Service Providers),” Carstensen wrote in a blog post Saturday afternoon.

“Google operates DNS servers because we believe that you should be able to quickly and securely make your way to whatever host you’re looking for, be it YouTube, Twitter, or any other,” Carstensen wrote.

“But imagine if someone had changed out your phone book with another one, which looks pretty much the same as before, except that the listings for a few people showed the wrong phone number.”

That’s exactly what the Turkish ISPs have done.

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